Always Playing an Angle

1st August 2014

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The Pool Scene

New Post on http://thepoolscene.com/international-pool-and-billiards/philippines-duel-china-2-world-pool-team-supremacy/

PHILIPPINES TO DUEL CHINA 2 FOR WORLD POOL TEAM SUPREMACY

Pinoys on fire as they quash China 1, while China 2 squeaks by Japan as showdown looms in Beijing on Saturday.

By Ted Lerner

Dang Ching Hu and Wang Can of China 2 Dang Ching Hu and Wang Can of China 2

WPA Press Officer

Photos Courtesy of Tai Chengzhe

(Beijing)–One team took the easy road. The other had to claw tooth and nail and barely made it through. But when they meet tomorrow in the finals of the 2014 World Pool Team Championship in Beijing, the Philippines and China 2 are sure to engage in a knockdown, drag out struggle for team supremacy in professional pool.

After six days of non-stop 8-ball, 9-ball and 10 ball, featuring 25 teams from across the globe, fans and organizers really couldn’t have asked for a better final. On the one hand you have the Philippines, arguably the finest pool playing country the world over. The Philippine team, comprised of pool heavyweights Dennis Orcollo, Lee Vann Corteza, Carlo Biado and Rubilen Amit, have been literally on fire this week and are playing without a care in the world.

On the other hand there’s China 2, representing the world’s most populous nation and whose government backed sports program has one goal firmly in mind; to be the best. The fact that the final will be held in the very heart of China’s capital probably puts much of the onus and pressure for victory on the shoulders of the Chinese players. But the way they won their semi-final battle against Japan today may have provided China with just the battle hardening gut check they needed to see them through on the last day.

The final, which will take place Saturday at the Tongzhou Luhe high school, will begin at 2PM Beijing time(GMT +8).

Based on performances in Friday’s two semi-final matches, the Philippines will have to be considered the favorite coming into Saturday’s final. The Pinoys were coming into their semis match with China 1 today brimming with confidence after pulling out a dramatic win in their quarterfinal match the day before against Chinese-Taipei. China 1 was loaded top talent. But no matter where they looked, they were met with stiff resistance from the Pinoys. And they quickly wilted under the heat.

To get things going, Orcollo squared off with Wu Jiaqing in the 8-ball singles, in a fine pairing of two former World 8-ball Champions. With the score tied 3-3 in a short race to 6, Wu made one fatal mistake when he missed with one ball left on the table. Orcollo stood up and punished Wu from there on in, and streaked to a convincing 6-3 victory.

The Philippines Rubilen Amit The Philippines Rubilen Amit

On the adjacent table Biado and Corteza took on Li He Wen and youngster Chu Bing Chia in 8-ball doubles. The Chinese pair never even got into the match as the Filipinos cruised to a massive 6-1 win.

Up 2-0 and needing just two more to win, the Philippines decided to press the advantage. Corteza matched up with Li He Wen in 9-ball and proceeded to crush the Chinese, winning going away, 8-3.

Amit was on the adjacent table doing battle with Women’s World 9-ball Champion Han Yu in 9-ball. This seemed to be China’s best chance to get back in the match but Amit, who has played some of the best pool of her career this week in Beijing, quickly put a stranglehold on the proceedings. Han had no answer and went down in flames as Amit won 8-3.

Overall, the performance put in by the Pinoys was simply breathtaking. Afterward, Orcollo talked about how the team discussed strategy before coming to the arena. Clearly the friendly Filipinos were in no mood to make nice on the table.

“Last night we struggled just to survive,” Orcollo said. “So we felt good out there today. We were talking about it today, how to prepare. I told the team we need to play better, play aggressive , don’t be scared, don’t show weakness, don’t give them a chance. If we have the chances, we have to go for the kill, for the finish.”

Orcollo also had praises for Amit.

“She’s doing good. We are behind her all the way. If she makes a mistake, we are there to help her. I think having us here helps give her more confidence.”

Orcollo also had an interesting answer when asked what winning the World Team Championship would mean for himself and his teammates. Normally the Filipinos will state they want to win to bring honor to their country. Orcollo was hoping a win in the final would help revive the pro game in the Philippines, which has nearly died over the last three years, leaving players like himself and his teammates little chance of earning a living at home.

“I hope we can win this tournament so that the sport of pool can rise again in the Philippines,” Orcollo said. “As of now, our sport doesn’t have the support of any big companies in the Philippines. The Filipino people still love pool but no big companies want to sponsor any tournaments. I hope the big companies can see the great things we are doing and recognise us and bring a big tournament to the Philippines. Winning this event could be a window for us to get back to what it was like when Efren(Reyes) was world champion.”

If the Philippines semi-final win was a waltz, China 2’s win was a hard core mash up. Japan came into the match under zero pressure, while China now had the burden of having to carry the hopes and expectations of their nation.

Lee Van Corteza (R) and Carlo Biado of Team Philippines Lee Van Corteza (R) and Carlo Biado of Team Philippines

China 2, with Liu Haitao, Dang Ching Hu, Wang Can, Fu Xiaofang and Liu Shasha came sprinting out as the youngsters Dang and Wang cruised to a 6-1 win in doubles 8-ball over Naoyuki Oi and Hayato Hijikata. But Japan stayed focused and loose and the match was soon tied 1-1 as Sasaaki Tanaka grinded out a 6-5 win in 8-ball.

The fabulous Fu brought China 2 back up with a gutty come from behind 8-5 in 9-ball over Chichiro Kawahara. But Oi kept the pressure on the Chinese with an 8-4 win over Dang in 9-ball to tie the score at 2-2.

The pressure was starting to slowly build but Liu Haitao and Liu Shasha brought some relief with a strong performance in 10-ball doubles, winning 7-2. Now, the match and the tournament came down to the 10-ball singles between Wang and Hijikata, which was happening at the same time on the next table. With the Japanese up 5-3 in a race to 7, it looked like the two teams were headed for a shootout, exactly where the Chinese didn’t want to go.

The 20 year old Wang, however, proved he is older and wiser than his years as he battled back to tie the match at 5. He again tied it at six and the pair went to a thrilling one rack decider with everything– the game, the match, the tournament– in the balance. After a nervy safety battle, Wang got an opening and cashed in as the crowd roared its approval and the Chinese players celebrated.

Wang’s reaction afterward about his thrilling match seemed to represent just the demeanor that the Chinese will need if they are to defeat the Philippines in the final on Saturday; play with a laser like focus on the task at hand, and always remember that you are not alone.

“I wasn’t nervous,” Wang said of his match with Hijikata. “I was just focused on my job.

“In a team competition the atmosphere is different. We have to cooperate and work together to be successful. At this point both teams have come a long way so it’s really 50-50. Our coaches haven’t put any burden on us to win. They always tell us to just play our best. So that’s what we’ll so on Saturday.”

The winner of the 2014 World Pool Team Championship will take home $80,000 while the runner up will take home $40,000. The total prize fund is $300,000.

FINAL
Saturday at 2PM(GMT +8)
Philippines vs. China 2

RESULTS SEMI-FINALS
Philippines 4 – 0 China 1
China II, 4 – 2 Japan

*The WPA is on hand in Beijing to bring fans around the world full updated coverage of the 2014 World Pool Team Championship.

You can follow the World Pool Team Championship on our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/worldpoolteamchampionship.

The WPA is also on Twitter @poolwpa.

Or visit our website at www.wpapool.com

*The World Pool and Billiard Association(WPA) is the governing body of the sport of pocket billiards.

The Liado U Valley World Pool Team Championship is sanctioned by the WPA, The Multi-Ball Games Administrative Center of General Administration of Sport, Chinese Billiard and Snooker Federation, Beijing Municipal Bureau of Sport, Beijing Sports Federation.

FORMAT: In each match between two countries, the two teams play each other in a set of six matches, all alternate break; two races in 8 ball, two in 9-ball and two in 10-ball. One 8-ball match is men’s scotch doubles, race to 6. The other 8-ball match is a men’s singles, race to 6. In 9-ball, the teams compete in a women’s singles, race to 8, and a men’s singles race to 8. In 10-ball, the teams play one mixed doubles match(scotch doubles), race to 7, and one men’s singles match race to 7. The female player must play in the 10-ball mixed doubles match, and a 9-ball match. No player is permitted to play more than two matches per session.

SHOOTOUT: If a match ends up 3-3 in the knockout stage, the winner will be decided by a shootout. In a shootout the 8 ball is placed in the middle of the table down near the short rail, level with the first diamond, while the cue ball is placed way down at the head string. The three men and one woman on each team take turns trying to pot the 8-ball in either far corner. All players play in sequence and the team to score six hits first with a margin of two or more(6-4, 7-5, etc.) wins the match and advances to the next round.

TEAMS
Philippines–Dennis Orcollo, Lee Vann Corteza, Carlo Biado, Rubilen Amit
China 2—Liu Haitao, Dang Ching Hu, Wang Can, Fu Xiaofang, Liu Shasha

1st August 2014

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The Pool Scene

New Post on http://thepoolscene.com/instructional/big-red-instructional-5-9-10-ball-break-strategies/

Big Red Instructional #5: 9 & 10 Ball Break Strategies

Erik InstructionalHello everyone. Today we will be looking at the differences in strategical play between 9 ball and 10 ball. Most other popular games like 8 ball, 9 ball, one pocket, banks and straight pool are so different in premise and therefore do not show a lot of similarities in strategical play. However, 9 ball and 10 ball are the only two pool games that are fundamentally the same. In this article I will attempt to demonstrate some hidden differences that come from adding the one extra ball to the classic rotation style game of 9 ball.

The first thing that everyone will immediately notice is that in 9 ball the rack is a diamond shape, in 10 ball the rack is a pyramid shape. Because of the difference in the structure of the rack we have to consider if the same style break will be equally effective in both games. In 9 ball the most effective break is from the side rail. Remember the goal in execution of a proper break is to break in a way that you will make the same ball in the rack consistently.

In 9 ball the most consistent ball is the wing ball and the most reliable angle to break from to make the wing ball is from either side rail. In 10 ball the most consistent balls off the break are the ones directly behind the 1 ball. These balls travel on a direct path diagonally towards the side. In 10 ball the balls at the very bottom corners of the rack travel on a 4 rail path back to the same corner they are racked near. Oddly, in 10 ball there are six balls in the rack that take a path toward a pocket. The four that I have mentioned and the two balls in the middle of the back row also take a path banking to the bottom rail and back to the top corner pockets. In 9 ball there are only 3 balls that take a consistent path towards pockets.

Relevant to the previous analogy you would think that the 10 ball break is easier to execute, but in reality it is much harder. Here are the 3 main reasons why the ten ball break is harder:

#1 – In 10 ball you have to hit the rack much harder to get the desired effect of the wired balls

#2 – The most effective angle for the cue ball to start at must be somewhere near the middle of the table, using a closed bridge on the bed of the table rather than being able to use the rail as an aid for bridging.

#3 – The previous tracks for wired balls are extremely sensitive to hitting the 1 ball square from the angle you are breaking from, which again is harder to do than in 9 ball because of the amount of force required and because of the difficulty of the bridging.

In professional tournaments, most 9 ball tournaments have made rules that require the breaker to break from the centre in order to take away from the wired balls. In 10 ball tournaments, and I have heard that they are already doing this in Europe, I believe that they will eventually force the breakers to break from the side rail which is a very interesting contrast.

The main differences in pattern play in 9 ball and 10 ball are that after the break in 9 ball, the balls end up coming to rest near the rails. In ten ball the balls end up in the middle of the table more often. There are a lot of implications for this and I will attempt to shed some light on them.

Implications in 9 ball:
When the balls are positioned near the rail it makes pattern play much easier because the middle of the table is more open. When you are forced to move the cue ball from end to end this open space is very useful. You will also see consistent patterns that come up relative to playing position from one ball on the rail to another ball on the rail. When playing safe in 9 ball, professional players will usually attempt to play safe behind one of the balls near the rail. It is actually tougher to get into these small areas but professionals are able to do so at a much higher rate than amateurs. I believe this is an area where pros have a big edge on amateurs and semi pros when playing 9 ball.

Big Red using the side rail break at the China Open 2011 Big Red using the side rail break at the China Open 2011

Implications in 10 ball:
When balls are positioned near the middle of the table, position play becomes a lot more variable. There will be a lot of shots where the cue ball is moving a shorter distance but there will be a smaller landing area. When moving the cue ball end to end it will often take more precision because the middle tracks of the table will be less accessible. Because the break is so hard to execute there will often be more balls on the table at the beginning of the game and this makes playing safe a lot easier. When the balls are positioned in the middle it will generally be easier to play safe and you will notice that it is easier to fluke a safe after a miss.

Big Red playing Andy Aupin at this years Canadian Championship, Photo by Ivar De Laat Big Red playing Andy Aupin at this years Canadian Championship, Photo by Ivar De Laat

Both games have a lot of merit and I think for pros the best game to play is 10 ball, mainly because of the increased difficulty in executing the break and in overall cue ball control. However I think as our sport develops, 9 ball is still a good game for TV. Mainly because the cue ball is moving a lot more and because although 9 ball is definitely more offensive I think ten ball can swing into long defensive battles that can tend to drag on for the average home viewer.

31st July 2014

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The Pool Scene

New Post on http://thepoolscene.com/international-pool-and-billiards/pinoy-pride-eyes-prize/

PINOY PRIDE EYES THE PRIZE

Team Philippines wins a thriller over Chinese-Taipei to join China 1, Japan and China 2 in the all-Asian semi-finals of the 2014 World Pool Team Championship.

By Ted Lerner

Team Philippines celebrates after barely beating Chinese Taipei Team Philippines celebrates after barely beating Chinese Taipei

WPA Press Officer

Photos Courtesy of Tai Chengzhe

(Beijing)–Whenever the Philippines and Chinese-Taipei square off in pool, it’s a guarantee that the sparks are going to fly among two of pool’s giants.

But tonight in the quarterfinals of the World Pool Team Championship at the Tongzhou Luhe High School in sultry Beijing, the two squads put on a memorable show that was like a raucous New Year’s Eve fireworks display. And after enough dramatic twists and turns to last the whole year, the Philippines eked out a thrilling 4-2 victory right at the wire to advance to the semi-finals of pool’s biggest team event.

There the proud Pinoys will have to buckle down yet again, as they will face a strong China I squad, who will have the backing of not only the hundreds of fans who are expected to attend in person, but over 1.5 million people who will be tuning in on television. That semi-final will take place at 1PM(GMT +8)

Chinese pool fans, who literally number in their tens of millions, will have even more to cheer about in the second semi-final, as the other hometown team, China II, will face Japan in a match that will begin at 6:30PM.

That the 2014 World Pool Team Championship has come down to an all-Asian final four is not much of a surprise. With each team featuring at least one woman, and the great majority of the best women players being from Asia, it was clear from the beginning that the Asian teams would have the advantage.

The Philippines began the day on Thursday as one of the favorites to the take the crown, as they had been playing brilliantly in the group stages over the previous three days. After easily downing Indonesia in the round of 16 in the first session, the Pinoys, featuring Dennis Orcollo, Lee Vann Corteza, Carlo Biado and Rubilen Amit, came up against their arch rivals and the defending champions of this event, Chinese-Taipei, who brought back the same winning side from 2012–Chang Jun Lin, Ko Pin Yi, Fu Che Wei and Chou Cheih Yu. The Taiwanese were also one of the favorites but they had a much tougher opponent in the round of 16 in Austria. Taiwan, though, continued their fine play and beat the Austrians 4-2.

The Philippines versus Taiwan literally screamed “Marquee Matchup” and could have been a worthy final. Indeed, as could be expected, the proceedings were close the entire way. The two teams split the 8 ball singles and 8-ball doubles matches, then split the men’s 9-ball and women’s 9-ball. The two teams were tied at 2-2, and as the two 10 ball matches began, everyone in the arena began predicting the proceedings would be decided by a thrilling shootout.

Indeed it certainly looked to be headed that way as both matches, which were played on adjoining tables, headed for the cliff at exactly the same time with the outcome in doubt down to the final ball.

Team Japan celebrated wildly after winning a shootout against Germany Team Japan celebrated wildly after winning a shootout against Germany

In the race to 7, 10-ball singles, Orcollo got out to a 5-2 lead over arch rival Chang Jung Lin, only to see Chang storm back to tie at 5-5. Orcollo took the next rack and Chang took the next to leave a sudden death decider. The two traded pots and several safeties before Orcollo barely pulled off the win.

On the other table, the Philippine pair of Biado and Amit also squandered a 5-2 lead and even saw the pair of Fu and Chou move to the hill first at 6-5. Amit, who has been a rock for team Philippines all week, stayed steady, as did Biado, and they tied the match at 6-6. In the final rack, Fu broke dry and Biado and Amit stepped up for a nervy clear, and a spot in the final four.

“We were lucky we didn’t lose or it didn’t go to a shootout,” a thrilled Orcollo said afterward. “I was so nervous. We want to win this for the entire Philippines. We want to make all Filipinos proud.”

The Pinoys will come into the semis and even bet when they take on the absolutely loaded China 1 with the likes of Li He Wen, Wu Jiaqing, Chu Bing Chia, Women’s World 9-ball Champion Han Yu and Chen Siming. China 1 had no trouble in the Final 16 today, handily downing an overmatched Singapore team, 4-1.

China 1, though, had to go deep in their quarterfinal match against a very scrappy Poland. The Poles, who beat Croatia in the round of 16, are one of the class programs in the sport of pool and they played like it against China. Down 3-1, Poland had China 1 even midway through their two 10-ball matches and was looking at a possible shootout to pull off a miracle upset. But the Chinese were simply too good, winning 4-1 to claim their much deserved spot in the semi-finals.

As strong as China 1 looked, their counterparts in China 2 have looked even better. China 2, with Liu Haitao, Dang Ching Hu, Wang Can, Fu Xiaofang, Liu Shasha, were absolutely untouchable all day today, first crushing Sweden 4-0, then mercilessly manhandling Great Britain by the same score.

Afterward, former Women’s World 9-ball Champion Fu Xiao Fang talked about how she and her teammates have dealt with the pressures of playing for the world’s most populous nation.

“As you know,” Fu said through an interpreter, “as a pro player we strive to win every match. But this event is not like an individual event. We are playing for our country. There’s more pressure than an individual event. And the first day most of our team were not in the best form. Our coach helped us get through the obstacles by sitting us down together where we could share our feelings. Since then we’ve played much better. This is a team and we all share the burden so we can earn honors for our country.”

China 2 will certainly come into their semi-final against Japan as a favorite, but not that heavy a favorite, as the fun-loving Japanese seem to have a knack for survival. After taking care of the USA in the round of 16, 4-1, Japan–with veterans Naoyuki Oi, Sasaaki Tanaka, Hayato Hijikata and Chichiro Kawahara, faced a confident Germany in the quarterfinals. Germany had earlier outlasted a tough Russian squad, 4-2.

Germany, with the likes of Ralf Souquet and Thorsten Hohmann, took the lead at 3-2, only to see Japan tie with a win in the 10-ball doubles. This sent the match into the first shootout of the tournament. In the shootout, the teams traded attempts at a highly difficult, full table cut shot on the 8-ball with the first team to make 6 pots, and win by two, becoming the winner of the match. Germany held the early lead in the shootout at 3-2, but Japan came back and eventually won the shootout 7-5, to grab the last spot in the Final Four.

The Japanese wild celebrations afterward made it a fitting ending to a thrilling day of professional team pool.

The winner of the 2014 World Pool Team Championship will take home $80,000 while the runner up will take home $40,000. The total prize fund is $300,000.

*The WPA is on hand in Beijing to bring fans around the world full updated coverage of the 2014 World Pool Team Championship.

You can follow the World Pool Team Championship on our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/worldpoolteamchampionship.

The WPA is also on Twitter @poolwpa.

Or visit our website at www.wpapool.com

*The World Pool and Billiard Association(WPA) is the governing body of the sport of pocket billiards.

The Liado U Valley World Pool Team Championship is sanctioned by the WPA, The Multi-Ball Games Administrative Center of General Administration of Sport, Chinese Billiard and Snooker Federation, Beijing Municipal Bureau of Sport, Beijing Sports Federation.

SEMI-FINALS
FRIDAY, AUGUST 1
CHINA 1 VS PHILIPPINES 1PM (GMT +8)
CHINA 2 VS. JAPAN 6:30PM

RESULTS QUARTERFINALS
China I, 4 -1 Poland
Philippines 4 -2 Chinese-Taipei
China II 4 – 0 Great Britain
Japan 3 -3 Germany (Japan wins in shootout, 7-5)

RESULTS FINAL 16
China I, 4 – 1 Singapore
Poland 4 – 1 Croatia
Philippines 4 – 0 Indonesia
Chinese-Taipei 4- 2 Austria
China II 4- 0 Sweden
Great Britain 4 – 1 Vietnam
Germany 4 – 2 Russia
Japan 4 – 1 USA

Semi-finals will be played on Friday, 1PM and 6:30PM
Finals will be played on Saturday at 2PM

FORMAT: In each match between two countries, the two teams play each other in a set of six matches, all alternate break; two races in 8 ball, two in 9-ball and two in 10-ball. One 8-ball match is men’s scotch doubles, race to 6. The other 8-ball match is a men’s singles, race to 6. In 9-ball, the teams compete in a women’s singles, race to 8, and a men’s singles race to 8. In 10-ball, the teams play one mixed doubles match(scotch doubles), race to 7, and one men’s singles match race to 7. The female player must play in the 10-ball mixed doubles match, and a 9-ball match. No player is permitted to play more than two matches per session.

SHOOTOUT: If a match ends up 3-3 in the knockout stage, the winner will be decided by a shootout. In a shootout the 8 ball is placed in the middle of the table down near the short rail, level with the first diamond, while the cue ball is placed way down at the head string. The three men and one woman on each team take turns trying to pot the 8-ball in either far corner. All players play in sequence and the team to score six hits first with a margin of two or more(6-4, 7-5, etc.) wins the match and advances to the next round.

TEAMS

China 1—Li He Wen, Wu Jiaqing, Chu Bing Chia, Han Yu, Chen Siming
Philippines–Dennis Orcollo, Lee Vann Corteza, Carlo Biado, Rubilen Amit

China 2—Liu Haitao, Dang Ching Hu, Wang Can, Fu Xiaofang, Liu Shasha
Japan—Naoyuki Oi, Sasaaki Tanaka, Hayato Hijikata, Chichiro Kawahara

30th July 2014

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The Pool Scene

New Post on http://thepoolscene.com/napa-pool-league/napa-ontario-refer-player-promotion/

NAPA Ontario Refer A Player Promotion

The NAPA Ontario Refer A Player Promotion is Back for the Fall Session

The very successful “Refer a Player” promotion by NAPA Ontario is back for the Fall session.

Any existing NAPA Ontario player will receive $5 off their session for every new player they bring into a NAPA Ontario Pool League, to a maximum of $20.00.NAPA Pool League

There are some conditions and restrictions. For more information contact Rob MacArthur at 905.903.6425, or, contact him through the NAPA Ontario website at www.napaontario.ca.

The Ontario Chapter of the North American Poolshooters Association runs 8 ball, 9 ball, 10 ball, Lagger’s Choice and Scotch Doubles league for all ages across Ontario. Players compete for cash, prizes and to qualify for the Annual NAPA Nationals.

30th July 2014

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The Pool Scene

New Post on http://thepoolscene.com/international-pool-and-billiards/two-money-rounds/

TWO FOR THE MONEY ROUNDS

Both China sides lead the way into the Final 16 at the 2014 World Pool Team Championship in Beijing

By Ted Lerner
WPA Press Officer

China 1 will be a difficult side to beat China 1 will be a difficult side to beat

Photos Courtesy Tai Chengzhe

(Beijing)–Now, the fun begins.

After three days of round robin group play, in which 25 teams from all over the globe duelled in a veritable cavalcade of 8-ball, 9-ball and 10-ball, the 2014 World Pool Team Championship has been whittled down to the Final 16.

All matches from here through Saturday will be single elimination, and you can bet your last Chinese Yuan that the tension and drama levels inside the Tongzhou Lhue High School arena in Beijing will be thick and hot. For not only are the teams playing for $300,000 in prize money-with $80,000 going to the winning side— they are also competing for national pride. There’s something about wearing your country’s flag and having the backing and support of your fellow countrymen and teammates that takes this sport to a whole other dimension.

Leading the way in terms of support will be both China sides, both of whom completely waltzed through their group unscathed all week. But while the Chinese squads are certainly formidable on paper, they both have had absolutely no competition in their groups.

Each China side had what could be considered the easiest draws in the event. Now, however, that will all change. And while China 1—with Li He Wen, Wu Jiaqing, Chu Bing Chia, Han Yu, and Chen Siming– and China 2—with Liu Haitao, Dang Ching Hu, Wang Can, Fu Xiaofang, and Liu Shasha– will probably advance at least to the quarters and perhaps further, it all comes with a caveat that other teams won’t have to deal with. The pressure from the home fans placed on both China teams will be massive.

The one team that won’t have to deal with that problem are the defending champions, Chinese-Taipei. The Taiwanese, featuring a powerhouse lineup of Chang Jun Lin, Ko Pin Yi, Hsu Kai Lun, Fu Che Wei, and female player Chou Cheih Yu, have been untouchable all week here in Beijing. They are playing in that quiet, smooth style that carried them to the title two years ago in this very same arena. Today in their last match of the group stage, the Taiwanese went up against Korea, which was fighting for survival. Although Taiwan was already guaranteed a spot in the Final 16, they showed no mercy on the Ga Young Kim-led Koreans, winning the six-match showdown easily, 5-1.

Team Japan plays loose and stress free Team Japan plays loose and stress free

Another team that looks unbeatable right now is the Philippines. Dennis Orcollo, Lee Vann Corteza, Carlo Biado and Rubilen Amit have all the winning experience in the world to see themselves to the winner’s circle on Saturday. And they have been all business so far this week. Today the Philippines went up against a very formidable Poland side and basically toyed with the Poles, winning in a rout 6-0.

The Philippines could be looking at a potential quarterfinal matchup vs. Chinese-Taipei. Everyone and their brother expects the Philippines to get past Indonesia on Thursday. Chinese-Taipei, though, will have to buckle down as they will be banging heads with a very strong Austrian team.

Great Britain, featuring Daryl Peach, Chris Melling, Karl Boyes and Allison Fisher, have the fully loaded talent and moxie to make a serious run. Against Germany today, the Brits looked their usual top class and won the match 4-2, although both sides were guaranteed a spot in the Final 16 no matter who won. The Brits will play Vietnam in the Final 16 and are heavily favored to advance to the quarter-finals. There they will probably meet up with China II which plays heavy underdog Sweden. Great Britain vs. China II promises some serious fireworks should it come to pass, as it most probably will.

One team that has flown under the radar but can definitely win this event is Japan. The Japanese are easily the loosest squad in this event, laughing and enjoying themselves on every shot. It has served them well in the past as they went all the way to the finals here two years ago before losing to Chinese-Taipei. Japan goes into their Final 16 match with the USA a big favorite. The Americans squeaked into the Final 16 and haven’t played up to standard yet this week.

The winner of Japan-USA will play the winner of Germany-Russia, which will be a very close matchup.

All matches in the Final 16 will take place on Thursday, July 31 beginning at 1PM(GMT +8). The quarterfinals will be played at 6:30PM.

*The WPA is on hand in Beijing to bring fans around the world full updated coverage of the 2014 World Pool Team Championship.

You can follow the World Pool Team Championship on our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/worldpoolteamchampionship.

The WPA is also on Twitter @poolwpa.

Or visit our website at www.wpapool.com

*The World Pool and Billiard Association(WPA) is the governing body of the sport of pocket billiards.

The Liado U Valley World Pool Team Championship is sanctioned by the WPA, The Multi-Ball Games Administrative Center of General Administration of Sport, Chinese Billiard and Snooker Federation, Beijing Municipal Bureau of Sport, Beijing Sports Federation.

FINAL 16
July 31, 1PM(GMT +8)

China 1 vs. Singapore
Poland vs. Croatia

Philippines vs. Indonesia
Chinese-Taipei vs. Austria

China II vs. Sweden
Great Britain vs. Vietnam

Germany vs. Russia
Japan vs. USA

Quarterfinals Begin at 6:30PM July 30(GMT +8)
Semi-finals will be played on Friday, 1PM and 6:30PM
Finals will be played on Saturday at 2PM

FORMAT: In each match between two countries, the two teams play each other in a set of six matches, all alternate break; two races in 8 ball, two in 9-ball and two in 10-ball. One 8-ball match is men’s scotch doubles, race to 6. The other 8-ball match is a men’s singles, race to 6. In 9-ball, the teams compete in a women’s singles, race to 8, and a men’s singles race to 8. In 10-ball, the teams play one mixed doubles match(scotch doubles), race to 7, and one men’s singles match race to 7. The female player must play in the 10-ball mixed doubles match, and a 9-ball match. No player is permitted to play more than two matches per session.

SHOOTOUT: If a match ends up 3-3 in the knockout stage, the winner will be decided by a shootout. In a shootout the 8 ball is placed in the middle of the table down near the short rail, level with the first diamond, while the cue ball is placed way down at the head string. The three men and one woman on each team take turns trying to pot the 8-ball in either far corner. All players play in sequence and the team to score six hits first with a margin of two or more(6-4, 7-5, etc.) wins the match and advances to the next round.

TEAMS

China 1—Li He Wen, Wu Jiaqing, Chu Bign Chia, Han Yu, Chen Siming
Singapore—Chan Keng Kwang, Aloyisus Yapp, Koh Seng Ann Aaron, Charlene Chai Zeet Huey, Toh Lian Han, Hoe Shu Wah

Poland–Karol Skowerski, Tomasz Kaplan, Mateusz Sniegocki, Katazyna Weslowska
Croatia—Josip Susnjara, Ivica Putnik, Marko Lisnic, Antonijevic Zrinka

Philippines–Dennis Orcollo, Lee Vann Corteza, Carlo Biado, Rubilen Amit
Indonesia—Bewi Simanjuntak M. Bewi, Rudy Susanto, Muhammad Fadly, Silvana

Chinese-Tapei—Chang Jun Lin, Ko Pin Yi, Hsu Kai Lun, Fu Che Wei, Chou Cheih Yu
Austria—Albin Ouschan, Tong He Yi, Jurgen Jenisy, Thomas Knittel, Jasmin Ouschan, Sandra Baumgartner

China 2—Liu Haitao, Dang Ching Hu, Wang Can, Fu Xiaofang, Liu Shasha
Sweden—Anreas Gerven, Marcus Chamat, Tomas Larsson, Caroline Roos

Great Britain—Daryl Peach, Karl Boyes, Chris Melling, Allison Fisher
Vietnam—Trung Le Quang, Tuan Nguyen Anh, Quan Do Hoang, Le Doan Thi Ngoc

Germany—Thorsten Hohmann, Ralf Souquet, Sebastian Staab, Ina Kaplan
Russia—Konstantin Stepanov, Ruslan Chinakhov, Andrey Seroshtan, Ann Mazhirina

Japan—Naoyuki Oi, Sasaaki Tanaka, Hayato Hijikata, Chichiro Kawahara
USA—Oscar Dominguez, Hunter Lombardo, Corey Deuel, Jennifer Barretta

RESULTS FROM DAY 3, GROUP STAGE

SESSION 1,

Korea 4 – 2 New Zealand
Indonesia 5 – 1 Malaysia
China 1, 6 – 0 Hong Kong
Croatia 4 – 2 Sweden
USA 5 – 1 Bulgaria
Austria 6 – 0 South Africa
Vietnam 4 – 2 Singapore
Philippines 6 – 0 Poland

Session 2
Russia 5 – 1 New Zealand
Malaysia 4 – 2 India
Great Britain 4 – 2 Germany
China 2, 6 – 0 Australia
Chinese-Taipei 5 – 1 Korea
Japan 6 – 0 Indonesia
China 1, 5 -1 Sweden
Croatia 3 – 3 Mongolia

30th July 2014

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The Pool Scene

New Post on http://thepoolscene.com/snooker/passing-baton-next-generation/

Passing the Baton to the Next Generation

When you look around at the average age of a snooker player these days in Canada, it is quite obvious that most players are over the age of 40, if not more. Simple mathematics explains that the reason for this is that no efforts have been made in the last 20 years or so to develop our game here.baton1

Like anything else in the life cycle, if a new generation does not get involved in something, eventually it just dies. To our knowledge, there are no Junior programs in this country at the moment, nor are there any other activities directed towards getting the young players actively involved.

Good news! The first Inter University Snooker Championships has been announced and it already has a few players registered. If you know anyone that is under 25 years old and has some interest in playing in it, please let them know about this event. Registration is minimal and this will be the start of a new evolution of the game here in Canada.

academy-sheffield-chinese-players-with-ronnie

No man is an island and if everyone does a little bit to help grow the game that we love, we will one day sit back and enjoy the fruits of our labor by possibly seeing our own Ronnie O’Sullivan or Judd Trump. They are out there, they are just waiting for us to pass the the baton.

If you would like to do your part in helping in any way, please contact us at 888-487-7506

When: August 25-29, 2014
Where: Monte Carlo Billiards 1590 Dundas Street East, Toronto, ON
Prize: $5000 Total Prize Pool!

30th July 2014

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The Pool Scene

New Post on http://thepoolscene.com/hill-hill-pool/kasperowitsch-breaks-duck-battle-top-three/

Kasperowitsch Breaks His Duck In Battle Of Top Three

On Cue Billiards – 22nd July 2014
Season 1 – Week 5

Ryan Kasperowitsch Ryan Kasperowitsch

Mr. Consistent, Ryan Kasperowitsch, continued his fine run of form of late to win this week’s tournament at On Cue Billiards. After sharing the spoils last week he was brimming with confidence and it showed on the baize with some superb play.

First on the hit-list was Roland ‘Big Break’ Leblanc. Kasperowitsch produced a spectacular jump-shot in the first frame (his first of three with 100% success), only to leave the 7-ball hanging over the pocket. Roland couldn’t clear, missing his final ball for Ryan to take the opener. Some miscalculations and plenty of chances for both followed in the next few frames with Kasperowitsch coming out on top to race into a 4-0 lead in their race to 5. It’s never over until it’s over in this game and Roland wasn’t going down without a fight. One mistake too many from Ryan in the next two frames saw Roland take two on the bounce. However, the comeback was short-lived as Leblanc sank the 8-ball midway through the 7th for Kasperowitsch to progress 5-2.

Roland Leblanc Roland Leblanc

One minor slip-up on the night for Kasperowitsch was in the battle of the top two. A lapse in concentration perhaps allowed Newsome to take a 3-0 lead. From then on the match began as Ryan produced his regular shot making and classy play but it was too late. Newsome retained the advantage as the pair went blow for blow and took a 5-3 win over his rival. Rob took the momentum into the next match as he matched-up with an off-colour Leblanc. Surely just a one-off, Roland was not on his usual game this week and will inevitably come back much stronger next time. He went down 5-2 against Newsome.

For the third time in five weeks, Newsome and Kasperowitsch met in the final. There seemed to be no stopping Kasperowitsch this week and some quick-fire frames saw him take a 4-1 lead. A break and run by Newsome brought the deficit down to 4-2 and there were chances for both in the next couple of frames which both went the Brit’s way to make it 4-4 and take us to a decider. A clearance attempt by Newsome went awry with a poor positional shot and Kasperowitsch did not need a second invitation to take advantage of an open table and clear up without a problem and take the win 5-4.

Ryan Kasperowitsch - Week 5 Champion Ryan Kasperowitsch – Week 5 Champion

Hill Hill Pool’s zero handicap 8-ball singles tournament is held every Tuesday at On Cue Billiards (349 Jane Street, Toronto) starting at 7:30pm.

For more details check out:
facebook.com/hillhillpool
hillhillpool.ca

Tagged: Roland LeblancRyan Kasperowitsch

29th July 2014

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The Pool Scene

New Post on http://thepoolscene.com/uncategorized/napa-now-offers-singles-leagues/

NAPA Now Offers Singles Leagues

North American Poolshooters Association Announces They Now Offer Singles Leagues

The Ontario Chapter of the North American Poolshooters Association announced today that they now will be offering singles leagues as part of their billiards offering.

Besides Scotch Doubles and 3, 4 and 5 match Team Leagues, pool players will now have the option in playing in 8 Ball, 9 Ball, 10 Ball and Lagger’s Choice Leagues in Singles format.

Players already have the choice of mixed, female, male and family leagues, as well as skill limit and no skill limit and coaching and non-coaching leagues.NAPA Pool League

League officials feel this will be a great way to introduce new players and build new leagues.
The North America Poolshooters Association (NAPA) is the managing body of NAPA pool leagues throughout the United States and Canada. The focus of the NAPA is to provide a unique and competitive playing ground for pool shooters across North America.

NAPA Ontario benefits include: No Annual Membership Fees; Cash and Trophies; National Qualification; Comprehensive Online Play and Team Stats and Data; Local and National Ranking; Qualify for Nationals Once and Keep Your Spot; Pay One Session Fee and Pay No More; No Regionals; No Holiday or Long Weekend Play; Invites to NAPA Exclusive Special Events; A Superior Handicapping and Anti-Sandbagging System; Easy Mobile Scoring.

For more information contact Rob MacArthur at 905.903.6425 or through the web site at www.napaontario.ca.

For more information on NAPA visit the NAPA National web site at www.napaleagues.com.

28th July 2014

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The Pool Scene

New Post on http://thepoolscene.com/international-pool-and-billiards/wpa-world-pool-team-championship/

Report from Day 1 of the WPA World Pool Team Championship in Beijing

FAVORITES ROMP TO EASY WINS ON OPENING DAY

Teams stick to the predictable script as the 2014 World Pool Team Championship gets underway in Beijing.

By Ted Lerner
WPA Press Officer

Opening Ceremony Opening Ceremony

(Beijing, China)–Day 1 at the 2014 World Pool Team Championship at the Tongzhou Luhe High School in Beijing may have been short, with only one session played, but the results were indicative of just how the remainder of the group stages will most likely proceed over the next few days.

16 out of the 25 teams saw action today, including both Chinese squads, and all the favorites won by landslides or comfortable margins.

What this shows is that the multi-discipline format of the event makes surprises about as difficult to come by as a school playground here in Beijing full of blonde Chinese students. The World Pool Team Championship is not an ordinary 9-ball event, where an upstart can get red hot and catch a big favorite by surprise. Yes, it can happen here. But that surprise would be just one match out of a total of six matches played between the two countries in one contest. (one 8 ball men’s doubles, one 8-ball men’s singles, one 9-ball women’s singles, one 9-ball men’s singles, one 10-ball mixed scotch doubles, one 10-ball men’s singles.) Any pool players knows what happens when you play long sets, or multiple sets against an opponent. The age old phrase, “the crème always rises to the top,” comes to mind.

The cream of professional pool didn’t have to even rise anywhere today as it began the evening’s action already at the top and stayed firmly there throughout. Defending champions Chinese- Taipei, with its powerhouse line up of stars Chang Jun Lin, Ko Pin Yi, Hsu Kai Lun, Fu Che Wei, Chou Cheih Yu demolished an overmatched New Zealand squad 6 -0. The Taiwanese played in the same smooth and calm manner throughout this event in 2012 and were practically untouchable then. Any team lined up against this juggernaut better be prepared.

Liu Haitao and Liu ShaSha of China 2 Liu Haitao and Liu ShaSha of China 2

Several hundred people turned out to cheer on their hometown heroes and they didn’t leave disappointed. China 1, with Li He Wen, Wu Jiaqing, Chu Bing Chia, Han Yu, and Chen Siming manhandled Mongolia 6 -0. China 2—stacked with Liu Haitao, Dang Ching Hu, Wang Can, Fu Xiaofang, and Liu Shasha had no issues with Singapore, winning handily 5-1.

The Philippines is surely going to qualify for the final 16 and contend for the title. Dennis Orcollo, Lee Vann Corteza, Carlo Biado and Rubilen Amit had a few early issues with a fired up Bulgarian squad. But the Pinoy stars buckled down for a 5-1 win.

In other matches, Great Britain defeated South Africa 6-0, Sweden outlasted Hong Kong 4-2, while Japan, which always seems to have the most fun in these types of events, easily beat Malaysia 5 -1.

The best and most even match of the evening took place between the USA and Poland. The USA was up 2-1 when the USA’s Jennifer Baretta, playing 9-ball singles, missed a long 8-ball at hill-hill. Poland’s Katazyna Weslowska cleared the table for the win and tie it for Poland. The win gave Poland a shot of confidence and they went on to win both their 10-ball matches for a 4-2 win.

The 2014 World Pool Team Championship continues on Tuesday with all teams seeing action over two sessions. The 25 teams, each featuring at least three men players and one woman player, have been divided into 6 groups playing round robin. 16 teams will qualify for the single elimination stage which begins on Thursday, July 31.

The winning team will receive $80,000. The runner up team will take home $40,000. The total prize fund is $300,000.

Results Day 1 Group Stages
Sweden 4- 2 Hong Kong
China 1, 6 – 0 Mongolia
China 2, 5 – 1 Singapore
Poland 4 – 2 USA
Japan 5 – 1 Malaysia
Chinese Taipei 6 – 0 New Zealand
Philippines 5 – 1 Bulgaria
Great Britain 6 – 0 South Africa

Matches Tuesday July 29

Session 1, 1PM(GMT + 8)
Germany vs. Austria
Australia vs. Vietnam
Korea vs. Russia
Indonesia vs. India
Sweden vs. Mongolia
Hong Kong vs. Croatia
Philippines vs. USA
Bulgaria vs. Poland

Session 2, 6:30PM
Great Britain vs. Austria
China 2 vs. Vietnam
Chinese-Taipei vs. Russia
Japan vs. India
China 1 vs. Croatia
Mongolia vs. Hong Kong
South Africa vs. Germany
Singapore vs. Australia

*The WPA is on hand in Beijing to bring fans around the world full updated coverage of the 2014 World Pool Team Championship.

You can follow the World Pool Team Championship on our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/worldpoolteamchampionship.

The WPA is also on Twitter @poolwpa.

Or visit our website at www.wpapool.com

*The World Pool and Billiard Association(WPA) is the governing body of the sport of pocket billiards.

The Liado U Valley World Pool Team Championship is sanctioned by the WPA, The Multi-Ball Games Administrative Center of General Administration of Sport, Chinese Billiard and Snooker Federation, Beijing Municipal Bureau of Sport, Beijing Sports Federation.

Group A
Philippines–Dennis Orcollo, Lee Vann Corteza, Carlo Biado, Rubilen Amit
Poland–Karol Skowerski, Tomasz Kaplan, Mateusz Sniegocki, Katazyna Weslowska
USA—Oscar Dominguez, Hunter Lombardo, Corey Deuel, Jennifer Barretta
Bulgaria— Stanimir Dimitrov, Radostin Dimov, Lyudmil Georgiev, Kristina

Zlateva Group B
China 1—Li He Wen, Wu Jiaqing, Chu Bign Chia, Han Yu, Chen Siming
Sweden—Anreas Gerven, Marcus Chamat, Tomas Larsson, Caroline Roos
Hong Kong—Kwok Chi Ho, Eric Lee, Lo Ho Sum, Robbie James Capito, Lee Tricia Gar Yun.
Croatia—Josip Susnjara, Ivica Putnik, Marko Lisnic, Antonijevic Zrinka
Mongolia—L. Delgerdalai, D. Damdinjamts, A. Yeruult, , A. Delgerkhuu, Z. Zoljargal,

Group C
Great Britain—Daryl Peach, Karl Boyes, Chris Melling, Allison Fisher
Germany—Thorsten Hohmann, Ralf Souquet, Sebastian Staab, Ina Kaplan
Austria—Albin Ouschan, Tong He Yi, Jurgen Jenisy, Thomas Knittel, Jasmin Ouschan, Sandra Baumgartner
South Africa—Rajandran Nair, Charles R. Kuppusamy, Kumersen Reddy, Thilomi Govender

Group D
China 2—Liu Haitao, Dang Ching Hu, Wang Can, Fu Xiaofang, Liu Shasha
Australia—Robby Foldvari, David Rothall, Michael Cassiola, Lyndall Hulley
Vietnam—Trung Le Quang, Tuan Nguyen Anh, Quan Do Hoang, Le Doan Thi Ngoc
Singapore—Chan Keng Kwang, Aloyisus Yapp, Koh Seng Ann Aaron, Charlene Chai Zeet Huey, Toh Lian Han, Hoe Shu Wah

Group E
Chinese-Tapei—Chang Jun Lin, Ko Pin Yi, Hsu Kai Lun, Fu Che Wei, Chou Cheih Yu
Korea—Ryu Seung Woo, Jeong Young Hwa, Ha Min Ug, Kim Ga Young
Russia—Konstantin Stepanov, Ruslan Chinakhov, Andrey Seroshtan, Ann Mazhirina
New Zealand—Matthew Edwards, Phillip Nickpera, Johnathan M. Pakieto, Molradee K. Yanan

Group F
Japan—Naoyuki Oi, Sasaaki Tanaka, Hayato Hijikata, Chichiro Kawahara
Indonesia—Bewi Simanjuntak M. Bewi, Rudy Susanto, Muhammad Fadly, Silvana
India—Sumit Talwar, Sundeep Gulati, Lalrina Tenthlei, Suniti Damani
Malaysia—Ibrahim Bin Amir, Tan Kah Thiam, Jason Ng Keat Siang, Suhana Dewi Sabtu, Klaudia Djajalie

28th July 2014

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The Pool Scene

New Post on http://thepoolscene.com/napa-pool-league/inaugural-n-p-canada-cup-challenge/

Inaugural N.A.P.A Canada Cup Challenge

Quebec

The North American Poolshooters Association (N.A.P.A) held their inaugural Canada Cup Challenge this past Saturday July 26th, at Raxx Billiards Bar &Grill in Kingston, Ontario. This pitted league members from Montreal against rival league members from the Kingston and surrounding area against one another.

The Québec team came with 15 shooters and the Ontario team had 11. This challenge included singles and scotch double events in 8,9 and 10 ball and “laggers choice” in which the winner of the lag picks the game. It was races to 7, with 5 singles matches and 2 scotch doubles matches taking place in all the disciplines.

Montreal features extensive leagues and circuits such as the Québec Federation, where most of these players have honed their skills in. This perhaps gave them the edge they needed as the Québec team went on to win the first ever Canada Cup Challenge convincingly 220-154. Talking with some of the Ontario team members after the event I found out a few of their top shooters were missing on this day.This should add to this rivalry for next year as team Ontario now feel they have something to prove.

Results Q

The next Canada Cup Challenge will be held in Montreal at a location to be determined at a later date. It will run a little differently next year as players will have to qualify to be a member of either team. N.A.P.A is a fairly new organization to the pool league scene. They run in a similar manner to the T.A.P leagues and the C.P.A. They boast an extensive “sandbagger” free handicapped system that has a place for all players amateur to world class.

A big thank you goes out to the host at Raxx Billiards Bar & Grill. As well as Rob MacArthur (Ont) and Eric Rousseau(QC) who organized this fun and flawless event. If you are interested in joining the N.A.P.A leagues or directing one yourself talk to either MacArthur or Rousseau (depending where you reside) and they will set you up with everything you need.

Both Teams